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Stephen Hawking’s New Lecture, “Do Black Holes Have No Hair?,” Animated with Chalkboard Illustrations

You can now hear in full on the BBC’s website the first part of Stephen Hawking’s 2016 Reith Lecture—‘Do Black Holes Have No Hair?’ Just above, listen to Hawking’s lecture while you follow along with an animated chalkboard on which artist Andrew Park sketches out the key points in helpful images and diagrams. We alerted you to the coming lecture this past Tuesday, and we also pointed you toward the paper Hawking recently posted online, ‘Soft Hair on Black Holes,’ co-authored with Malcolm J.

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Leaving flatland – quantum Hall physics in 4-D

In literature, the potential existence of extra dimensions was discussed in Edwin Abbott’s satirical novel “Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions” (1884), portraying the Victorian society in 19th century England as a hierarchical two-dimensional world, incapable of realizing its narrow-mindedness due to its lower-dimensional nature.

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China’s big brother: the AI revolution is upon us

Zhu Long, co-founder of pioneering Yitu Technologies, whose facial-recognition algorithms have logged 1.8 billion faces and caught criminals across China, says AI will change the world more than the industrial revolution

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Reading a neural network’s mind

A new analytic technique sheds light on inner workings of neural networks trained to perform natural-language-processing tasks, and even suggests possibilities for improving the performance of machine-translation systems.

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New Virtual Reality Tool Lets You Explore the Bitcoin Blockchain in 3D – Bitcoin News

As an intangible asset, bitcoin can be hard to picture. Yes, you know what it is, you’re familiar with how the blockchain works, and you’ve probably tried (and failed) explaining it to an elderly relative. Every conceivable facet of bitcoin’s underlying technology can be monitored, analyzed, and charted – that’s the beauty of a public …

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A state Supreme Court justice’s open letter to AI

Let me start with two brief stories about social change. The first concerns changing laws and values about relationships. Only in 1967-in the aptly named case of Loving v. Virginia-did the United States Supreme Court recognize that laws prohibiting interracial marriage violated the United States Constitution. Nineteen years before, in 1948, the Supreme Court of…

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Electron orbitals may hold key to unifying concept of high-temperature superconductivity

A team of scientists has found evidence for a new type of electron pairing that may broaden the search for new high-temperature superconductors. The findings, described in the journal Science, provide the basis for a unifying description of how radically different “parent” materials-insulating copper-based compounds and metallic iron-based compounds-can develop the ability to carry electrical current with no resistance at strikingly high temperatures.