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Engineers design artificial synapse for “brain-on-a-chip” hardware

MIT engineers have designed an artificial synapse for “brain-on-a-chip” hardware, a major stepping stone toward portable artificial intelligence devices.

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The Neural Network Zoo – The Asimov Institute

With new neural network architectures popping up every now and then, it’s hard to keep track of them all. Knowing all the abbreviations being thrown around (DCIGN, BiLSTM, DCGAN, anyone?) can be a bit overwhelming at first. So I decided to compose a cheat sheet containing many of those architectures. Most of these are neural networks, some are completely …

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Wired for habit

Research from MIT shows that habit formation in primates is driven by neurons that weigh the cost of a habit, as well as the reward. The research provides insights into neuropsychiatric disorders that involve problems with repetitive behavior, such as Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, obsessive-compulsive disorder, Tourette syndrome, and autism spectrum disorder.

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An enzyme and synaptic plasticity

Synapses are ‘dynamic’ things: they can regulate their action in neural processes related to learning, for example, but also as a consequence of diseases. A research team — led by SISSA — has demonstrated the role of a small enzyme in synaptic plasticity. The study has just been published in the journal Nature Communications.

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No sedative necessary: Scientists discover new 'sleep node' in the brain

(Medical Xpress)-A sleep-promoting circuit located deep in the primitive brainstem has revealed how we fall into deep sleep. Discovered by researchers at Harvard School of Medicine and the University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, this is only the second “sleep node” identified in the mammalian brain whose activity appears to be both necessary and sufficient to produce deep sleep.

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No sedative necessary: Scientists discover new ‘sleep node’ in the brain

(Medical Xpress)-A sleep-promoting circuit located deep in the primitive brainstem has revealed how we fall into deep sleep. Discovered by researchers at Harvard School of Medicine and the University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, this is only the second “sleep node” identified in the mammalian brain whose activity appears to be both necessary and sufficient to produce deep sleep.