Targeting levels of specific protein could improve memory in aging, reduce symptoms of PTSD

A neural circuit mechanism involved in preserving the specificity of memories has been identified by investigators from the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Center for Regenerative Medicine and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI). They also identified a genetic “switch” that can slow down #memory generalization — the loss of specific details over time that occurs […]

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Teaching life a new trick: Bacteria make boron-carbon bonds

In another feat of bioengineering, Caltech’s Frances Arnold, the Linus Pauling Professor of Chemical Engineering, Bioengineering and Biochemistry, and her team have created bacteria that can, for the first time, make chemical compounds containing bonds between boron and carbon. Before now, such boron-carbon bonds came only from the laboratories of chemists and could not be produced by any known life form.

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Proteome of the human heart mapped for the first time

A healthy heart beats about two billion times during a lifetime, thanks to the interplay of more than 10,000 proteins. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) and the German Heart Centre at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now determined which and how many individual proteins are present in each type of cell in the heart. They have now compiled the first atlas of the healthy human heart, known as the cardiac proteome. The atlas will make it easier to identify differences between healthy and diseased hearts in future.

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IBM, Scientists Seek Public’s Help With Millions Of Virtual Experiments Mapping The Human Microbiome

The Microbiome Immunity Project aims to help scientists understand how the trillions of bacteria in our bodies impact human disease. IBM’s World Community Grid wants to harness the computing power donated by millions of volunteers from all over the world to do it.

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Scientists Have Uncovered The Atomic Structure of a Key Alzheimer’s Protein For The First Time

For the first time, scientists have revealed the chemical structure of one of the key markers of Alzheimer’s disease, capturing high-resolution images of the abnormal tau protein deposits suspected to be behind Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerat

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Seeing RNA at the nanoscale

MIT researchers have adapted a technique known as expansion microscopy to visualize RNA molecules at high resolution in tissue samples. They have also made the technique easier to use, with off-the-shelf components.

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Study finds long-sought protein sensor for the 'sixth sense'-proprioception

Can you touch a finger to the tip of your nose with your eyes closed? Most of us can, thanks to a sense called proprioception, which tells us where our body parts are relative to each other and our environment. Not surprisingly, this sense is essential for normal movement and balance-walking, for instance.

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Study finds long-sought protein sensor for the ‘sixth sense’-proprioception

Can you touch a finger to the tip of your nose with your eyes closed? Most of us can, thanks to a sense called proprioception, which tells us where our body parts are relative to each other and our environment. Not surprisingly, this sense is essential for normal movement and balance-walking, for instance.

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Amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's and diabetes: Novel leads for inhibitors

When proteins change their structure and clump together, formation of amyloid fibrils and plaques may occur. Such ‘misfolding’ and ‘protein aggregation’ processes damage cells and cause diseases such as Alzheimer’s and type 2 diabetes. A team of scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) headed by Professor Aphrodite Kapurniotu have now developed molecules that suppress protein aggregation and could pave the way for new treatments to combat Alzheimer’s, type 2 diabetes and other cell-degenerative diseases.

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Amyloid plaques in Alzheimer’s and diabetes: Novel leads for inhibitors

When proteins change their structure and clump together, formation of amyloid fibrils and plaques may occur. Such ‘misfolding’ and ‘protein aggregation’ processes damage cells and cause diseases such as Alzheimer’s and type 2 diabetes. A team of scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) headed by Professor Aphrodite Kapurniotu have now developed molecules that suppress protein aggregation and could pave the way for new treatments to combat Alzheimer’s, type 2 diabetes and other cell-degenerative diseases.