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Secrets of longevity protein revealed in new study

Named after the Greek goddess who spun the thread of life, Klotho proteins play an important role in the regulation of longevity and metabolism. In a recent Yale-led study, researchers revealed the three-dimensional structure of one of these proteins, beta-Klotho, illuminating its intricate mechanism and therapeutic potential.

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The world’s most powerful acoustic tractor beam could pave the way for levitating humans

Acoustic tractor beams use the power of sound to hold particles in mid-air, and unlike magnetic levitation, they can grab most solids or liquids. For the first time University of Bristol engineers have shown it is possible to stably trap objects larger than the wavelength of sound in an acoustic tractor beam. This discovery opens the door to the manipulation of drug capsules or micro-surgical implements within the body. Container-less transportation of delicate larger samples is now also a possibility and could lead to levitating humans.

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Throwing molecular wrench into gene control machine leads to ‘melting away’ of leukemia

Cancer researchers today announced they have developed a way of sidelining one of the most dangerous “bad actors” in leukemia. Their approach depends on throwing a molecular wrench into the gears of an important machine that sets genes into motion, enabling cancer cells to proliferate.

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‘Brain-on-a-chip’ tests effects of biological and chemical agents, develop countermeasures

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists and engineers have developed a “brain-on-a-chip” device aimed at testing and predicting the effects of biological and chemical agents, disease or pharmaceutical drugs on the brain over time without the need

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Will machines one day be as creative as humans? – Microsoft Research

Recent methods in artificial intelligence enable AI software to produce rich and creative digital artifacts such as text and images painted from scratch. One technique used in creating these artifacts are generative adversarial networks (GANs). Today at NIPS 2017, researchers from Microsoft Research and ETH Zurich present their work on making GAN models more robust …

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Teaching life a new trick: Bacteria make boron-carbon bonds

In another feat of bioengineering, Caltech’s Frances Arnold, the Linus Pauling Professor of Chemical Engineering, Bioengineering and Biochemistry, and her team have created bacteria that can, for the first time, make chemical compounds containing bonds between boron and carbon. Before now, such boron-carbon bonds came only from the laboratories of chemists and could not be produced by any known life form.

Japan launches its first quantum computer

Japan has unveiled its first quantum computer prototype, amid a global race to build ever-more powerful machines with faster speeds and larger brute force that are key towards realising the full potential of artificial intelligence.

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Designing New Metal Alloys Using Engineered Nanostructures

Stony Brook assistant professor Jason Trelewicz uses the electron microscopy and computing resources at Brookhaven Lab’s Center for Functional Nanomaterials to characterize nanoscale structures in metals mixed with other elements. The goal of his research is to achieve unprecedented properties in classical materials for use in everything from aerospace and automotive components to consumer electronics and nuclear reactors.

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For The First Time Ever Scientists Have Boosted Human Memory With a Brain Implant

With everyone from Elon Musk to MIT to the US Department of Defense researching brain implants, it seems only a matter of time before such devices are ready to help humans extend their natural capabilities.

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Navigational view of the brain thanks to powerful X-rays

If brain imaging could be compared to Google Earth, neuroscientists would already have a pretty good “satellite view” of the brain, and a great “street view” of neuron details. But navigating how the brain computes is arguably where the action is, and neuroscience’s “navigational map view” has been a bit meager.

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Blood testing via sound waves may replace some tissue biopsies

Scientists from MIT and other institutions have developed a microfluidic device that uses sound waves to isolate cellular packets called exosomes from blood samples, which could be used to diagnose diseases such as cancer or fetal abnormalities.

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Scientists Have Uncovered The Atomic Structure of a Key Alzheimer’s Protein For The First Time

For the first time, scientists have revealed the chemical structure of one of the key markers of Alzheimer’s disease, capturing high-resolution images of the abnormal tau protein deposits suspected to be behind Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerat

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Breakthrough device heals organs with a single touch

Researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and Ohio State’s College of Engineering have developed a new technology, Tissue Nanotransfection (TNT), that can generate any cell type of interest for treatment within the patient’s own body. This technology may be used to repair injured tissue or restore function of aging tissue, including organs, blood vessels and nerve cells.

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This could provide vital clues about how star systems form and evolve

A TEAM of astronomers believe they have spotted the first moon outside our solar system.